Fall Courses 2019

Fall Courses 2019

Required Courses

PHIL 213. Ethics and Health Care. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: UNIV 112 or both ENGL 295 and HONR 200. A philosophical investigation of the main concepts and theories of ethics, with applications to fundamental moral questions as they arise in health care. The following issues may be used as illustrations: abortion, euthanasia and the right to die, human experimentation, treating mental illness, genetic technologies, the concepts of health and disease, and the funding of health care. Credit toward graduation may be received for only one of PHIL 201, 212, 213 or 214.

SCTS 301. Illness Narratives. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An overview of the history, interpretations and practices of reading and writing illness narratives — through case studies and theoretical perspectives, in fictionalized and nonfiction accounts, from the viewpoint of various actors (doctors, patients, patient families and their caregivers). Students will further examine the role of narrative knowledge in health care. Crosslisted as: ENGL 369.


Core I

HIST 392. Revolutions in Science I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of the history of science from the ancient Greeks to 1800, focusing on the development of scientific ideas, practices and institutions in Western society. Crosslisted as: SCTS 392.

HIST 397. Genetics and Society: 1865 to the Present. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An investigation of the science and technology of heredity in its historical, cultural and political contexts, emphasizing the ways in which genetic theories have been applied in attempting to solve social and biological problems. Crosslisted as: SCTS 397.


Core II

AFAM 310. Black Health Matters: Social Determinants of Health in the African American Community. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines health inequalities and health inequities in the U.S. Explores the primary health concerns and issues relating to the African American community. Focuses on social determinants of infant mortality, cardiovascular disease, AIDS, violence and cancer, as well as the impact these determinants have on the overall health status of African Americans.

ANTH 301. Human Evolution. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: UNIV 200 or HONR 200 with a minimum grade of C. Introduces the range of human diversity as well as a broad understanding of evolution and evolutionary biology, particularly as it applies to hominid evolution. Specific topics include basic genetics, primatology, paleontology and the hominin fossil record. Crosslisted as: BIOL 341.

ENGL 354. Queer Literature. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291 or 295. A study of queer literature. Considers issues of history, theory, aesthetics, politics, authorship and interpretive communities and examines the intersection of social identities with particular attention to race/ethnicity, sex, sexual orientation, gender expression, class and/or nationality. Crosslisted as: GSWS 354.

WRLD 220. Human Rights and Literature. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A cross-cultural survey of human rights violations. The moral, political and pragmatic dimensions in the international response to violations are investigated including transnational organizations that document abuses as expressed in memoirs, eyewitness accounts, literature and film.

Core II Substitutions

AFAM 346. Mental Health Across the African Diaspora. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Surveys theory and research on the interaction of culture and mental illness focusing primarily on populations of African descent in a seminar format. Topics to be addressed, through the lens of the Africana world, include epidemiological and ethnographic research on major psychiatric disorders, culture-bound syndromes and idioms of distress, mental health of immigrants and refugees, and cross-cultural competence in clinical practice.

ANTH 380. Medical Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ANTH 210 or 220. An introduction to the biological and cultural anthropological study of global health and well-being, including healing processes, the biosocial relations of healing management and relationships between biomedicine and pluralistic medical systems.

ENGL 391. Topics in Literature. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Maximum of 12 credits in all topics courses at the upper level. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291 or 295. An in-depth study of a literary genre, an aesthetic or cultural theme in literature, or of a major writer in English or American literature. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.


Core III

HCMG 300. Health Care Organization and Services. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the structure and function of the U.S. health services delivery system. Examines the role and responsibilities of health care professions and occupations, technology and financing arrangements in the delivery system.

PSYC 304. Life Span Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Reviews the basic concepts and principles of physical, cognitive and social development at each major stage of life-prenatal, infancy, toddlerhood, preschool, middle childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Consideration is given to the study of development at each stage of life and to different theoretical explanations for development. PSYC 301 Child Psychology may not also be taken for credit.

PSYC 412. Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Application of the principles and techniques of psychology to the field of medicine, to health maintenance and to illness. The integration of theoretical, research and applied issues is emphasized in the analysis of such topics as psychological/behavioral factors contributing to and protecting against physical illness (stress, smoking, exercise), factors relating to treatment and recovery (coping, treatment compliance), psychological problems resulting from illness and injury, and specific techniques and problem areas in health psychology (such as biofeedback, pain management, pediatric psychology, geropsychology, rehabilitation psychology and lifestyle change.).